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More getting political news via Internet

The net's increasing role in influencing political thought is highlighted in the latest Pew surveys:

"Reliance on the Internet for political news during last year's presidential campaign grew sixfold from 1996, while the influence of newspapers dropped sharply, according to a study issued yesterday.

Eighteen percent of American adults cited the Internet as one of their two main sources of news about the presidential races, compared with 3 percent in 1996. The reliance on television grew slightly, to 78 percent from 72 percent.

Meanwhile, the influence of newspapers dropped to 39 percent last year, from 60 percent in 1996, according to the telephone-based survey from the Pew Research Center for The People and the Press and the Pew Internet and American Life Project."
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